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Year 2001 No. 108-9, June 25-6, 2001 ARCHIVE HOME SEARCH SUBSCRIBE

Communiqué of the 7th Plenum of the CC of RCPB(ML)

Build the Workers’ Opposition!

Strengthen the Theory to Guide the Communist and Workers’ Movement!

Workers' Daily Internet Edition : Article Index :

Communiqué of the 7th Plenum of the CC of RCPB(ML)

North of Ireland:
Violence Stirred Up ahead of Trimble’s Resignation

Prodi Visits Ireland over Nice Rejection

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Communiqué of the 7th Plenum of the CC of RCPB(ML)

Build the Workers’ Opposition!

Strengthen the Theory to Guide the Communist and Workers’ Movement!

The 7th Plenum of the Central Committee of the Revolutionary Communist Party of Britain (Marxist-Leninist), held shortly after the Party’s programme of participating in the general election campaign, set the agenda of summing up this work and deciding on the focus of the Party’s work in the coming six months.

The 6th National Consultative Conference of the Party had elaborated what it meant for the Party to participate in the election campaign and in the political life of the country. This National Consultative Conference laid the basis for the success of the Party’s campaign and of opening up this front of work. It did so by drawing the guidelines and elaborating the theory guiding the action. The issue was that the Party implemented the first step of the plan, which had involved the necessary theoretical and ideological work. It took a stand in planting its flag as regards participating in political life to oppose the "Third Way" programme going through, confident in its own line and analysis, and united everyone on this basis.

The advance of the Party lay in the fact that the whole Party had used the campaign to implement the line adopted at the National Consultative Conference. How all the Party organisations should build on this work, as distinguished from the focus of the coming period, is a crucial question in the situation where the people have demonstrated their disaffection with representative democracy and the alternative must take root.

The organisations of the Party must stepwise continue to build on the implementation of the plan. They must take up the work to build the workers’ opposition. At the centre of this conception is that the workers must themselves constitute the political opposition to the agenda represented by the "Third Way" nationally and in the context of the struggle against globalisation internationally. This is particularly so since the TUC is renewing its attempts to head the workers’ movement away from constituting the alternative, while other forces conciliate with this programme. The bourgeoisie is moving ahead very rapidly with its anti-social programme, and the workers must be seriously organised to occupy the space for change in this situation.

While the Party organisations must grasp the work to build the workers’ opposition and take it up themselves, it is by developing the links and ties that have been fostered in the election period that the united front of the workers and people to the party-dominated system of governance will be developed.

The Party as a whole must develop its work to participate in the overall political life of the country, as well as building the workers’ opposition, so as to end its marginalisation and that of the workers from political life. Central to all this work is to develop the conception of worker politicians and to further find the means for worker politicians to come forward, so as to consolidate the advances made during the election.

This work has to be carried despite the pressure not to break with the old conscience. One form the conciliation with the old conscience takes is to suggest that all those that do not agree with the rationale of keeping the "unity of the labour movement" by maintaining its ties with the Labour Party are themselves splitting this "labour movement". This is an important issue in the communist and workers’ movement, and will not be solved by bad-mouthing the political forces in action, but by deepening the discussion on the stand to take towards challenging the retrogressive programme represented by the "Third Way".

Therefore, to build the Workers’ Opposition is very much the task of the moment. It is a practical step towards the working class actually coming to power, and the regions must continue to focus on how to facilitate this all-round political, organisational and practical programme, while continuing to wage the ideological struggle. The basic organisations must ensure that all comrades continue to find their bearings and are the organisations that actually wage the class struggle.

The vanguard will continue to develop the political unity of the forces in motion and lead the class in its struggle for its emancipation and a new socialist society. In particular, this involves providing the solutions to the problems which society faces in order that the working class takes centre stage in leading society out of the crisis.

At this stage, workers must make their contribution by joining the work of building the Workers’ Opposition. In joining this work, it cannot be lost sight of that discussion is needed about how to consolidate the mass communist party. In this respect, neither the general position that candidates must be selected by their peers nor any other general position must be transformed into a dogma, a stick which to beat those engaged in the actual work to realise the role of the modern communist party.

In identifying the focus and the theme of the work that lies ahead, the 7th Plenum paid attention to the Party’s experience since the 3rd Congress in March 1999. In the context of the tasks of the Party which had been crystallised – the work of participating in the political life of the country and building the Mass Party Press – and mindful of the fact that this is a period of consolidating the Party on the new historical basis, the experience has been that if theoretical work is done and the work and action is guided by the correct theory, then advances are made. The decisive theoretical work which had been accomplished in preparation for adopting the tactical line on participating in the election was the summing up on an ongoing basis of the experience of the struggle against the "Third Way". This, added to the Party’s existing theoretical arsenal on the nature of government in Britain in particular and in society in general and all its other theoretical weapons, and combined with the Party’s revolutionary stand, guided its political considerations. Theoretical work of this nature must be strengthened and have its proper place, a conclusion which is underlined by experience nationally and internationally. This is one of the most important conclusions which has come out of this initial work of participating in the political life of the country.

The 7th Plenum therefore took appropriate decisions to make sure that the Party’s theoretical work is on a par with what is required of the development of the work. Through this work, the Party will continue to give coherence to the struggles of the working class and people and open up further vistas for advancing the movement. The work of summation must be taken up with a plan as work in itself, with appropriate professionalism and specialisation. This will be the focus of the Central Committee’s work over the next six months. At the same time, the basic organisations also sum up on an ongoing basis in the context of the Party’s line of march, summing up their own experience and contributing to occupying and expanding the space for change on this basis.

The 7th Plenum took the decision to hold a National Consultative Forum on September 8 to present to the Party membership and its circles the summing up of the significance of the election and the Party’s participation in it, paying special attention to what it means to build the Workers’ Opposition. The NCF will involve them in deliberating on the coming work on this basis.

The Plenum further discussed the national and international situation and the ongoing work to build the Mass Party Press and put the full weight of this press behind the Party’s practical politics. It concluded its agenda in a militant and confident spirit.

Consolidate RCPB(ML) on the New Historical Basis!

Strengthen the Theory to Guide the Communist and Workers’ Movement!

Build the Workers’ Opposition!

Article Index



North of Ireland:

Violence Stirred Up ahead of Trimble’s Resignation

Last week, violence was stirred up in Belfast as talks got under way on Friday at Hillsborough Castle over the Peace Process. Along with the north of Ireland political forces, Northern Ireland Minister John Reid and Irish Foreign Minister Brian Cowen took part in the talks.

Before the talks, the Ulster Unionist leader David Trimble said he still intended to resign on July 1 if the IRA had not started to decommission weapons. David Trimble’s resignation as first minister would trigger a process leading to new elections for the Northern Ireland Assembly.

A further 1,600 British troops are being sent to the north of Ireland, a decision which was said to have been made before the recent violence took place. The decision to draft in the additional troops raises the number of British Army forces to 15,200. The troops are to be deployed, according to an Army spokesman, in connection with the forthcoming marching season. A major flashpoint is expected when Orangemen are once again prevented marching in Portadown, Co.Armagh, on July 8.

Sinn Fein parliament member Martin McGuinness has condemned the upsurge of violence and has criticised the silence of Protestant politicians.

The stage is set, at the beginning of Labour’s second term of office, for a further attempt to undermine and kill off the Peace Process. The issue is not simply the Peace Process, which should be regarded as a matter of concern to the political forces of the north of Ireland, and considered together with its all-Ireland dimension. The issue is primarily that the British government continues to regard the north of Ireland as a devolved section of the "United Kingdom". Its involvement carried out from this perspective means that it continually sets in motion the forces which prevent the people of the north of Ireland from being able to sort out their own affairs. However, this is not the crux of the matter. The crux of the matter is that the continued stirring up of trouble and violence in the six counties is used, as is the stirring up of politically motivated racial violence in Britain, to divert from the people taking their destiny into their own hands and uniting against the whole anti-social offensive and the status quo.

It can be predicted that the troubles in the north of Ireland will increase during Labour’s second term of office. The British and Irish working class and peoples must continue to insist that their problems be sorted out politically and that the British government must desist from organising to inflame the situation.

Article Index



Prodi Visits Ireland over Nice Rejection

The European Commission President, Romano Prodi, visited Dublin on Friday, June 22. The trip follows the rejection by the Irish people in the referendum on June 7 of the ratification of the Nice Treaty.

The Treaty of Nice deals with the arrangements to be put in place by the EU to ensure the continued domination of the European Union by the "big powers" as the EU is enlarged. The Treaty must be ratified by the 15 member states before coming into operation. A Bill to ratify the Nice Treaty was immediately put before parliament by the New Labour government in one of its first moves on coming into office. However, if one country does not ratify, then the Treaty must fall. Despite this, Romano Prodi and others, including Tony Blair, have been claiming the negative result of the Irish referendum was not a reason for stopping the process of ratification.

The European Commission President’s visit to Dublin took place in this context. Romano Prodi said he was on a "listening" trip to Dublin, and expressed his concern that the vote against the Treaty represented a broader anti-EU shift in Irish public opinion. "I tried to observe the campaign and it was a campaign on sentiments. So the problem is, has the Irish attitude towards Europe changed? This is my real point. It is even more serious than a No to Nice," he said.

It is reported that Romano Prodi acknowledged that unless Ireland finds some way to ratify the Nice Treaty, it will have to be set aside. He said bluntly that without Ireland’s ratification, "Nice sinks – stop."

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